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Papaya

For Chefs & Produce Managers
Food Service: 323-584-4940
Produce Managers: 800-468-7111

Seasonality: Year Round
Origin: Brazil, USA

The two most common varieties on the market today are Hawaiian and Mexican Papayas.

A native of the tropics, papayas can now be found growing in Hawaii, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Florida and Southern California. The two most common varieties on the market today are Hawaiian and Mexican Papayas.

Hawaiian Papayas (also known as Solo) have a bright, yellow-orange flesh and tender green-yellow skin. Mexican Papayas taste muskier and less sweet than papayas from Hawaii and have more of a green tinted skin.

The flesh of both types ranges from salmon-red to bright orange in color. The most notable difference between these two varieties is the size; while an average Hawaiian Papaya weighs about 1 pound, Mexican Papayas may weigh up to 10 pounds!

When selecting Melissa’s Papayas, choose those that are soft to the touch (similar to a ripe peach). Their color should be more yellow than green although, Mexican Papayas may remain mostly green even when fully ripe. 

Ripen firm Papayas at room temperature in a loosely closed plastic bag. Refrigerate ripe fruit in a plastic or paper bag for up to 3 days. Freezing is not recommended.

Cut in half lengthwise and scoop out the small black seeds from the center. Papaya may then be eaten with a spoon or peeled with a vegetable peeler and cut into slices. Discard seeds.